Ben's Deli delivers meals in custom printed boxes

Ben’s Kosher Deli Delivers Meals to Health Care Workers

Our friends at Ben’s Kosher Deli in New York are going above and beyond, delivering delicious meals to area health care heroes. To date, they have delivered over 2,000 meals to area hospitals!

Ben’s is a family owned deli with locations in Woodbury, Greenvale, and Carle Place on Long Island, Manhattan and Bayside in New York City, Scarsdale in Westchester County (just north of New York City), and in Boca Raton, Florida. They have been serving their customers since 1972.

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Teaching Kids About Recycling

America has one of the highest rates of recycling anywhere in the world. However, with the amount of trash in our dump sites, it is clear there is more work to do. It is estimated that 85% of our total waste can be recycled if more people practice recycling and learn more of the benefits. Recycling is a matter of choice and the more a person learns, the more likely they will make a conscious decision to recycle.

What Is Recycling?

The definition of recycling means the collecting, separating, and processing of items that would have been thrown away, and reusing them or re-manufacturing them into new items. An easy way to describe recycling is to think of reducing, reusing, and recycling. The goal is to cut the volume of waste that goes into landfills. Reusing is prolonging the usage of items not needed or used by donating. Finally, recycling materials and having them remade completes the process.

Why Do We Recycle?

There are many reasons why recycling is important. Recycling saves energy and helps environmental conditions. Recycling helps reduce greenhouse gas emission by decreasing the amount of industrial production. For example, recycling helps save natural resources, such as a tree, when a newspaper is saved and recycled.

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College Corner: Transitioning to Dorm Life

Beginning college is an exciting time, but transitioning from high school to college can seem overwhelming. College freshman have new and exciting experiences ahead of them and should look forward to beginning this new chapter in their lives with out worrying too much about the transition itself. To start off on the right foot, here are a few tips for college freshman to help them transition and succeed in college.

Making the Move

Making the move from your family home to your new college dorm can be overwhelming. Beginning with packing for school, it is important to really ask yourself what you will need in college. With limited space and the experience of sharing that space with a roommate, you probably won’t be able to bring the entirety of your bedroom; but consider this a new start. Decorating your college dorm can be fun and allows you to create a space that is truly yours in a brand new environment. Before you start picking out your new room colors and accessories, it is important to check with the college to see which items are not permitted in the dorms. Colleges typically prohibit the use of cooking appliances, space heaters, and items that require installation into a room, check out the requirements beforehand to save yourself time and money when preparing for your big move. The best advice to follow is to stick to the basics, you will accumulate more things throughout college; don’t feel that you need to buy everything all in one shot.

  • What to Bring to college: A list of important items to bring with you to college.
  • “What-Should-I-Bring” Checklist: An easy to use checklist to use when planning and packing for school, and what NOT to bring.
  • College FAQs: including general move in dates, what to bring, how to have a green dorm room, and more.
  • The “NOT” List: A general guide for college students living on-campus of what they should not bring to college, many colleges prohibit heating appliances and cooking equipment.

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Shipping Resources: History of the US Postal Service

Between the start of the Revolutionary period and World War 1, US postal officials committed themselves to improving the transportation of mail. From early days up to the present time, the Postal Service has helped in developing and subsidizing each new mode of transportation in the United States. Apart from the postal employees themselves, transportation was the most important development in mail delivery. Even when members of the general public were fearful or somewhat skeptical of the new types of transportation, postal officials still managed to experiment with different inventions that offered the potential for moving the mail faster.

As the delivery of mail evolved from foot to horseback, stagecoach, steamboat, railroad, vehicle, and airplane, mail contracts ensured the necessary income to build highways, rail lines, and airways that would eventually span the continent. By the turn of the 19th century, the Post Office department purchased some stagecoaches for operation on the nation’s roads where mail needed to travel. This encouraged the department to continue with new designs and to improve passenger comfort and safety while carrying mail. The Post Office also used steamboats to carry mail between towns where no roads existed.

In 1831, steam-driven engines were denounced so railroads began to carry mail short distances. By 1836, the Postal Service had its first mail contract with the Railroads. As early as 1896, before most people in the United States were aware of the automobile, the Postal Service was experimenting with the automobile as a faster and cheaper carrier of mail. In 1899, in it’s annual report, the department announced that it had tested the practicality of using the automobile to collect mail in Buffalo, NY. In 1902, the Post Office developed its first contract to carry mail by automobile in Buffalo, NY with plans to expand to other areas. From 1901 to 1914, the post office performed all of it’s vehicle service under contracts. In1914, unhappy with the high rates and frauds uncovered in these contracts, the postal department asked for and received the approval from Congress to establish the first government owned vehicle service in Washington, D.C.

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Boxes On Wheels: A Guide To Box Car Racing

Looking for a fun and educational hobby that you can do with your child? Box car racing, commonly referred to as soap box car racing, is the building and driving of home-made cars. These small cars do not contain a motor and simply rely on the power of gravity, reaching speeds up to 30 miles per hour. Soap box cars are capable of holding a driver, typically a child, and are built for the purpose of recreation or racing. The building of the box car itself can be very educational for a child, allowing him or her to enhance their building skills. Logical plans need to be created prior to the building, as box cars require tad bits of basic engineering, art work, and sometimes even electrical work in more advanced cars. Learn about the history of box car racing and how to build your own.

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Shipping Out and Moving Around: A Resource Guide For Military Families

Military families are burden with financial and emotional worries that is uncommon for civilians.  The constant moving and the scams geared towards military families places them in a unique place. Even though there are hardships military families are fortunate to be one of a kind and to have a bond with those they may never meet. With these hardships there are programs and initiatives set in place to lessen them.

Moving Around

Military dependents are often faced with PCS (Permanent Change of Station) moves every three to six years. This means clearing the old house and financial preparing for a new one. For those that own homes this can be financial over whelming. Preparing is key to successful move. Parents should always discuss with children the reason their moving. They should listen and comfort all fears to help their transition as well. Service members can make PCS moves successful by going to transportation early, contacting the Military Family Center and visiting the finance office all located at your current duty station.

  • For the Youth: A great resource for military children of all ages that focuses on specific issues of military children.
  • Moving Tips: Military wives give advice on how to keeping a military move sane and not so overwhelming.
  • Moving and Relocation: Plan a successful move with this government supported tool.
  • Preparing Children: Parents can learn how to make relocating easier for children.
  • For the Army Family: Fort Bragg gives excellent advice for military families on the move.

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Beyond Ballot Boxes – The Ultimate Voting Resource Guide

Voting is one of the most popular ways of electing people into power. People who vote express their opinions on the candidates they think can excellently manage the positions they are vying for. Countries where voting is practiced usually have a democratic government. These countries have rules that must be adhered to before the right to vote (suffrage) is exercised.

History of Suffrage

Suffrage simply means the civil right to vote. In the early stages of America’s democracy, the right to vote was enjoyed by men who held recognized positions or those who were privileged by their race, economic status, social importance and more. Women were also denied the opportunity to vote or contest for political offices. However, this is no longer the norm as it is now obvious that women and African Americans can now contest and share equal rights with others.

Some of the types of suffrage are universal suffrage and women’s suffrage. Universal suffrage is the franchise given to every adult who is a citizen of the country. However, the adult must be a responsible citizen and mentally sound. Universal suffrage first began in the Corsican Republic in 1755. In Europe, it was first recognized by Finland in 1906. Women’s suffrage grants women the right to vote or contest for offices with men at the same time. This began when Lydia Taft became the first woman to cast her vote in America during the British rule.

  • Women’s Suffrage: This page contains dates when women were given the right to vote in different countries.
  • The Right to Vote: Basically, the right to vote should be included in the US constitution.
  • Voting Rights: This site has a list of links to various individual attempts by historic Americans to implement the right of every citizen to vote.
  • Your Voting Power: This is a study guide on the right to vote.
  • Origins of Universal Suffrage: Movement for universal suffrage began in 1776 in Pennsylvania.
  • Woman Suffrage: This link contains the history of women’s suffrage in the world.

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Custom Collector Guides: Baseball Cards

When you think of old, rare baseball cards, names such as Babe Ruth, Joe Dimaggio and Ty Cobb probably come to mind. However, it’s likely that all three of these players collected cards when they were kids. In fact, there were cards that a young Babe Ruth probably thought of as old and rare. Ty Cobb only knew of the legend Cap Anson as retired.

Baseball is one of America’s oldest celebrated sports. Major League Baseball was founded in 1869, and by the end of the 1870s, baseball cards were being made. At first, baseball cards were used to help companies sell other products. They gave away a free card when someone bought a pack of candy. Through the 1950s, 60s and 70s baseball cards were best known for being given away with chewing gum. This was thanks to a company named Topps which made both cards and gum. Topps is still around today making collectible cards for sports, television shows and movies.

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Protecting Your Items While Shipping

In today’s modern world, one can send a message almost instantly over the Internet. Making purchases on-line has also become increasingly popular, according to FedEx, holiday shipping is expected to surpass 12 percent growth over last year—260 million packages—mostly from on-line purchasing. This does not include the U.S. Postal Service, United Parcel Service or independent shippers. But one can not receive that package instantly through the computer yet, meaning that packaging will become very important as on-line businesses and individual sellers will need to find inexpensive packing and shipping materials to meet the need, but still do the job.

Packing Peanuts

The old standby packing filler is packaging peanuts, the bane of adults, the delight of children who love the static electricity sticking to their clothes and seeing them thrown all over the floor. They are lightweight, but are strong enough that they do not break down while shipping. Environmentalists dislike them because they are made of Styrofoam and take forever to break down in landfills, if you use them or receive them, try recycling them to avert landfill use, such as children’s crafts or there are many stores that will take them to be reused. For those who want something better for the envirnoment there is a cornstarch-based packing peanut was developed that are biodegradable. They are just as effective at protecting as their plastic counterparts, but they are higher weight, create dust, and cost more.

Newspaper

Newspaper is an excellent alternative and is easily disposed of by burning in landfills. It is also very versatile, it can be used to wrap or stuff, or make it a filler by crinkling or shedding it. Just make sure that your product being packaged is pre-packaged to avoid getting newspaper ink on your gift, or find a blank newspaper material.

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How Much Can the Box Hold?: Exploring Volume

Volume is defined as how much three-dimensional space a solid, gas, or liquid occupies. The volume of most solids can be determined using various mathematical formulas involving the dimensions of the shapes. Cubic units are used to measure the volume of solids. Arithmetic formulas are commonly used to find the volume of simple shapes such as circular, regular, or straight-edged shapes. Integral calculus is used for more complicated shapes.

  • Surface Area & Volume – Grade 9 lesson plan for students to find the surface area and volume of objects.
  • Basic Solids – Information on space figures and how to find the volume for various shapes and figures.

Cubes

A cube, or regular hexahedron, is a 3-dimensional solid shape with six square sides. Three of the 6 sides meet at each of the 4 vertices. The cube contains congruent, polyhedral faces and angles. All edges of a cube are equal. To find the volume of a cube, measure the length of any side and multiply this length by itself 3 times.

Formula to find the volume of a cube:
V = [Length of Any Side] (Cubed)

  • Cube Lesson – Objective and lesson for finding the volume of a cube.

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